Archives for posts with tag: shoes

Picture 29107

La Gazette du Bon Ton, cover by George Lepape, cape by J. Lanvin, 1923

No_61_Mark_Rothko

Mark Rothko

Blue goes well with more blue….different shades together are intense, sensual and powerful.

Horst P. Horst Vogue USA,fashion ed Babe Paley,1946

Horst P. Horst, Babe Paley, 1946

Horst P. Horst is here using tones of blue to give depth and a sense of intrigue to his portrait of one of the most powerful women in New York just after the second World War, Babe Paley, Vogue USA’s feared fashion editor.

But blue works well with a number of colours (see my previous post on blue and red), in some cases muted shades such as green, give a light spring/summer feel to an outfit

Derwent Lees,girl in black hat,1912,NGVictoria

Derwent Lees, Girl in black hat, 1912, National Gallery of Victoria , Australia

Electric blue and grey are dynamic and work well for this child’s dress from 1918, but this colour combination would not be out-of-place on today’s catwalk

Bernard Meninsky,child in blue,1918,pc

Bernard Meninsky, Child in blue, 1918, pc

Blue and any acid colour has a stunningly fresh effect, catching our attention every time

Blue and orange:

beckmann-autoritratto-in-giacca-blu-1950,St Louis Art mus

Beckmann, self-portrait in blue jacket, 1950, St Louis Art museum, USA

Or blue and yellow:

Ethel Spowers, skaters, 1931 Bonhams

Ethel Spowers, skaters, 1931 (Bonham’s, London, UK)

mark rothko

Mark Rothko

Mme Gres, sleevless dress, 1968 with overcoat, met ny

Mme Grès, maxi dress + coat, 1968, Paris, Metropolitan Museum of Art , NY, USA

Mme Gres, sleevless dress, 1968

the dress

Mme Gres, sleevless dress, 1968 back, met ny

the back of the dress

Yellow also works splendidly with a greener shade of blue:

feather tunic, 7th-10thC, feathers sewn on cotton fabric,MET NY

Feather tunic, Peru, 7th – 10th century, Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY, USA

man shirt,embroid damask

Man’s short sleeved cotton Bazin top with yellow embroidery, west Africa, 21st century

Jeffrey-Campbell-shoes-Lita-(Blue-Green)-010604

Jeffrey Campbell shoes, USA, 21st Century

Advertisements

Francesco Merletti, First Lady, 2008, tecnica mista, 22 x 23,5 x 28,3 cm, collezione privata

Francesco Merletti, First lady, 2008, mix media, p.c.

For my last post on feathers I have decided to put together a selection of extraordinary feathered items I have come across. One thing is certain it takes character to wear feathers, just as it does to carry off real fur (yes! fur posts coming soon).

scarf and muff of sea-gull feathers, 1880-99,MET NY

Sea gull muff and scarf, 1880-99c, Metropolitan museum of Art, New York, USA

And it takes a real woman to carry off a whole bird – eyes, beak and all. This skillfully made “set” of sea gulls from the US seems totally audacious today, but probably less so back in the 1890s when there was a genuine vogue for stuffing and wearing just about any form of living species.

Emanuel Harry of London, gold earings with bird heads, 1865c, V&A

 Emanuel Harry, London, gold and bird head earings, 1865c, Victoria and Albert museum, London, UK

In 20th Century fashion, the trend re-emerges during the 1940s in the form of exquisite little hats:

LIFE cover 1942

cover of LIFE magazine, 1942

Hattie Carnegie, feather hat, 1940, MetNY

Hattie Carnegie, birds hat, 1940, Metropolitan museum of Art, New York, USA

Caroline Reboux, feather hat suede base, 1946, V&A

Caroline Reboux,Paris, bird hat, 1946,Victoria and Albert museum, London, UK

And finally lets not forget shoes! In this example (image below) Roger Vivier not only covers the exterior in feathers but also echoes the fluid shape of an exotic bird in the silhouette of the shoe – a masterpiece

Roger vivier for Dior, feather covered shoe,  1960c,Met NY

Roger Vivier for Dior, feather covered shoe, 1960, Metropolitan museum of Art, New York, USA